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Puebla and Oaxaca image

Puebla, or City of the Angels, is one Mexico's oldest cities, founded in 1531 by Fray Julian Garces who apparently saw angels in a dream indicating where the city should be built. 2 hours east of Mexico City, it is a charming colonial city, now a UNESCO world heritage site, particularly popular at weekends. Talavera tiles are a main feature of the architecture which consists of both Renaissance and Mexican baroque buildings and structures, many of which are painted in bright blues, reds and yellows. There are said to be 365 churches, many interesting museums, a lovely main square surrounded by restaurants and cafes, and the Cathedral is noted for its marble floors, gold leaf decoration and very tall bell tower.

Oaxaca was founded in 1521 on an earlier native site. The ‘City of Jade’ is a blend of native and colonial past, with fine stone buildings set around the impressive zócalo (main square), colourful markets and delicious regional cuisine. The Zapotec sites of Monte Albán and Mitla are nearby. Oaxaca’s cultural roots are particularly evident during the Guelaguetza festival celebrated each July, a beautiful display of costume, music and dance performed by local groups.

Our preferred accommodation

  • Casa Catrina image

    Casa Catrina

    Inn/Posada - Oaxaca
    A charming, small boutique hotel in a colonial house that has been beautifully renovated, maintaining many original features. It is 1 block from Santo Domingo Church and a short walk from the main square. 
  • Casa Conzatti image

    Casa Conzatti

    Inn/Posada - Oaxaca
    Opposite a park which has a local market on a Friday, Casa Conzatti is a modern, bright hotel with a courtyard, roof terrace, restaurant and bar.
  • Casa Oaxaca image

    Casa Oaxaca

    Inn/Posada - Oaxaca
    A small colonial boutique hotel with a pool, good restaurant, library and large patio. The rooftop terrace is ideal for whiling away an afternoon in a hammock. The staff are friendly and very helpful.
  • Hacienda Los Laureles image

    Hacienda Los Laureles

    Hacienda - outskirts of Oaxaca
    A small colonial hacienda with lots of character situated in a residential street. The gardens are beautifully maintained and there is a pool and spa. The restaurant is light and airy and serves good food.
  • Hostal de la Noria image

    Hostal de la Noria

    City hotel - Oaxaca
    A small, friendly hotel in a colonial building with a pretty courtyard, restaurant and small pool, only 2 blocks from the main zocalo.
  • Hotel Suites del Centro image

    Hotel Suites del Centro

    City hotel - Oaxaca
    A friendly hotel with spacious suites, including a kitchen and dining area and small patio.
  • La Purificadora image

    La Purificadora

    City hotel - Puebla
    A modern, stylish boutique hotel in a traditional building that was an old water purification factory. Many of the original features have been retained in the spacious communal areas and the lobby has firepits and a view of San Francisco Church. The bar and dining area are open-plan and the impressive tables were designed by architect Ricardo Legorreta and are made with old wood that was found in the former ice factory.
  • Mesónes Sacristía image

    Mesónes Sacristía

    City hotel - Puebla
    A small, colonial hotel with lots of character a short walk from the main plaza in a quiet street. The owners have been involved in the antique trade for generations and are well known in Puebla. Meals are either eaten in the courtyard or in the small restaurant, which serves typical food from the area, and there is a bar. The hotel also has a small cookery school.
  • Quinta Real Oaxaca (formerly Camino Real) image

    Quinta Real Oaxaca (formerly Camino Real)

    Inn/Posada - Oaxaca
    A smart and very central hotel by the Santo Domingo church, built around an old convent with cloisters and passageways. There is a lovely pool, gardens and a restaurant.

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